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New perspectives on dementia
Dementia, pharmacologic management, end of life care, screening for dementia
Event Type:
One Day Event
Date:
22 October 2018 - 22 October 2018
Location:
The Royal Society of Medicine
Contact:
Kathryn Stokes (Email Contact)
Contact Phone:
02072903940
Dementia is a common, chronic, irreversible condition predominantly affecting older people. It interferes with the patient’s cognitive functions, social interactions and behaviour. Although our understanding of its basic pathophysiology has significantly increased over the past few years, dementia remains essentially incurable. It is not rapidly fatal and many patients survive several years after the diagnosis is made. During this time the patients’ cognitive functions slowly deteriorate and the patient becomes difficult to manage.

In the absence of effective medication to treat dementia, relatives and caregivers have to adjust and be prepared to meet an increasing burden of care for the patient. With no option but to witness the gradual deterioration of their loved one, this exerts a tremendous psycho-social, as well as economic burden on the patient, relatives, caregivers and the community.



topics include: An update on the progress made in understanding the patho-physiology of dementia Help health care professionals appreciate the extent relatives’ and caregivers’ religiosity and spirituality can help them cope providing care to patients with dementia Provide information about resources available in the community such as those of the Alzheimer’s Association

This event is perfect for clinicians, nurses and other healthcare professionals providing care to patients with dementia, and administrators of nursing homes and similar institutions where patients with dementia are admitted.

Relatives of patients with dementia also will find the academic programme useful to better understand and appreciate the impact of the dementia on their loved ones’ impaired cognitive functions and aberrant behaviour. This understanding will provide caregivers the means of avoiding some aberrant behaviours.
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