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Paul Cann Seeks Exchanges of Knowledge and Information on the Role and Impact of creative Arts and Cultural Participation in Reducing Loneliness
BSG Member Paul Cann is seeking exchanges of knowledge and information on the role and impact of creative arts and cultural participation in reducing loneliness. This is Paul’s request.

BSG Member Paul Cann is seeking exchanges of knowledge and information on the role and impact of creative arts and cultural participation in reducing loneliness. This is Paul’s request:

I am seeking help please with some work I am doing to look at the role and impact of creative arts and cultural participation in reducing loneliness.  Please would you help me with any research references, contact details of anyone working in this specific area, pointers, suggestions, ideas, by contacting me at paullewiscann@gmail.com . I’d be enormously grateful.

Encouragingly there is a growing body of existing and emerging research evidence about the impact of participation in the arts and cultural activity.  The All-Parliamentary Group of Arts, Health and Wellbeing produced a substantial report last year: ‘Creative Health: the arts for health and well-being’.  This excellent document offers many opportunities and recommendations for a way of making creative arts more central to public policy and practice, to the benefit of many groups in society.  Like many such reports it has great potential for impact if studied and acted upon.

My perspective is as an advocate for the creative arts and as a management- group member of the Campaign to End Loneliness.  Cultural participation often represents an empowering avenue out of social isolation and loneliness.  And loneliness is increasingly on the policy agenda, both locally and now with the advent of the new Minister for Loneliness.  I would like to track down more specific evidence about the connection between the two.  The Baring Foundation has both written on this subject and funded a convincing report of work in Northern Ireland, ‘Not so cut off’.  I would greatly appreciate any help you can give in finding other sources of evidence.  Thank you.

We would also encourage members to use the BSG LinkedIn Group, “British Society of Gerontology Members on LI” for this kind of discussion.  This is a closed group for members only – if you are a member and would like to be added, please contact bsg.secretary@britgerontology.org

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